Feb 122024
 

In the wake of the Israel-Hamas war, once again there are voices suggesting that the Jews have no business to be in Palestine, a land that they stole from the Palestinians.

The history of the word Palestine, the identity of the Arabs who only began to call themselves Palestinians in the past century or so, has been discussed elsewhere. And the Jews have been around in places like Yerushaláyim thousands of years ago. But what about the more recent past? Did the Jews just return to their once sacred land en masse in the wake of the Holocaust, stealing land rightfully owned by a peaceful Arab populace?

Not exactly.

Here is an image from Tel Aviv, taken in 1939, when WW2 in Europe began in earnest (and incidentally, the year when my Mom was born):

Hmmm… looks decidedly Jewish to me.

Or how about a rare color (!) photo from Jerusalem, showing the sign of an orphanage…

A Palestine orphanage, to be precise, yet the lettering is Latin and Hebrew, because back then, Palestine was mostly used as the name of the land (the British mandate of Palestine), not yet a national identity.

Now I am not suggesting that a Palestinian identity has no legitimacy. I understand how this identity emerged, and how it was, at least in part, a reaction, or response, to Zionism, an attempt to (re-)create a Jewish nation in what was historically Judaea, later to be made part of the new Roman province of Syria-Palaestina. Having a right-wing government in Israel that no longer shows any interest in a resolution that might grant Palestinian Arabs statehood is not helpful, to put it mildly. But even as I recognize the hatred and distrust that exists on both sides, I would purposefully refrain from “bothsidesism”: All I have to do is to look at Palestinian grade school textbooks (there are plenty of infuriating examples on the Interwebs) to know which side advocates actual genocide (a word used far too frequently in recent months), which side characterizes the other (in textbooks!) with hateful caricatures even as it claims a right to own all land from the river to the sea.

 Posted by at 2:01 pm
Feb 102024
 

Now that Google’s brand new Gemini is officially available in Canada, so I am no longer restricted to accessing it through a VM that’s located in the US, I asked it to draw a cat using SVG. It did. It even offered to draw a more realistic cat. Here are the results.

What can I say? I went back to GPT-4 turbo. I was hoping that it has not forgotten its skills or became too lazy. Nope, it still performs well:

OK, the ears are not exactly in the right place. Then again, since I gave Bard/Gemini a second chance, why not do the same with GPT?

There we go. A nice schematic representation of a cat. I know, I know, a bit boring compared to the Picasso-esque creation of the Bard…

 Posted by at 1:47 am
Feb 062024
 

Back in the 1990s, those innocent days when the Internet first became part of our lives, we naively dreamed of an empowered public. A future in which disinformation is no longer possible. A future in which lies would be exposed with a minimum of effort, as the truth is just one quick AltaVista (no, Google didn’t exist yet) search away.

How wrong we were.

Instead, here we are in 2024 with a deeply fragmented public, each of us in our respective social media bubbles, consuming information that is all too often preselected for us by algorithms. Algorithms that are designed to find, and serve, content that we find agreeable.

And suppose, just suppose, that we grow mildly skeptical. Skeptical enough to turn to Google or Bing and do a quick search to find the truth. We find… no, not the truth. All too often, we find instead confirmation.

At least this appears to be the conclusion of a recent study, published in Nature, titled Online searches to evaluate misinformation can increase its perceived veracity.

And then there are all those (very valid) concerns about the integrity of the scientific literature. With tens of thousands published papers every year produced by “paper mills”, not to mention alarming rates of scientific fraud and retractions, does the truth even stand a chance?

Sure, when I read a paper on gravitation and cosmology, fundamental particle physics, computer science or machine learning, I am reasonably well equipped to assess its validity. But what about papers on, say, COVID vaccines? Methods to cure cancer? Sociopolitical trends in the European Union? Archeological discoveries? How can I tell truth from falsehood? I do not have the requisite background to evaluate the literature on my own. The press used to be helpful: Reputable news outlets made an effort to be impartial, interview the right experts, produce reasonable assessments. Not anymore: Especially here in North America, news outlets appear more interested in building a brand and a committed audience than the truth.

And then, to add insult to injury, there is foreign meddling: powers that are less than friendly towards the Western world order, most notably China and, especially, Russia, who are doing their darnedest best to make things worse by exploiting and further promoting our distrust in the media and, by extension, in the entirety of our Western system of institutions. Their goal is nothing less than dismantling the rules-based, liberal world order established in 1945, the pax Americana. I may not be an adoring fan of American politics, but between Washington and Moscow, or Washington and Beijing, I know which one to choose without hesitation.

But forming a realistic, valid view of the world that is largely based on the truth? That task is becoming more difficult with each and every passing day. We live in the days of Orwell’s “Ministry of Truth” and it didn’t even take an all-powerful totalitarian regime for this to happen.

Illustration courtesy of DALL-E.

 Posted by at 12:44 am
Feb 042024
 

The illness of our cat Rufus made me read up on the subject of spontaneous remission. No, I do not cling to false rays of hope, I was simply curious: Does it really happen? How often?

Long story short, Google soon led me to a study mentioning the earliest known description of induced spontaneous remission: The Ebers Papyrus.

The Ebers Papyrus is a roughly 3500 years old document, essentially a medical textbook or at least notes. In addition to recipes for numerous remedies, it also contains descriptions of various illnesses, their diagnosis, and methods of treatment.

Here is one example out of many:

Experiential knowledge regarding an a’at growth of fat: When you identify an a’at growth of fat on any body part of a man (and) you find that it comes and goes under your fingers, and where it somehow can be permanently separated by your hand, then you say for this: “This is an a’at growth of fat. A disease that I will treat.” Because of this you then prepare a knife-treatment for it. May it be treated according to the treatment of a wound!

I like it especially (assuming it is not a stylistic mistranslation) how the text instructs the physician-in-training to announce his diagnosis. It instills confidence, but also potentially invites questions or criticism before a treatment is attempted. And there’s no mumbo-jumbo, no superstition or religious mysticism: Facts are facts.

From more than three thousand five hundred years ago.

 Posted by at 11:37 pm